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07/01/2009 at 12:00 PM ET

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Anon on

I think regifting is fine. You’ve got two choices really if you don’t like a present you’ve received. Regift it or not accept the gift, which is tackier? I think its better that a gift be used instead of sitting in the closet. However, I think people should always include a receipt so the person can take it back.

Holly R. on

I don’t know if I necessarily agree with the article saying that heavy moms have a harder time noticing their children’s weight issues. I’m a morbidly obese woman, married to a morbidly obese man. I’m in a long line of morbidly obese family members. When it comes to my daughter, though, I know what is considered normal. I know what is healthy. I consistently practice healthy eating habits for her, activity levels, etc. I’m actually closer to hyper-aware of her weight BECAUSE of my own. I don’t want her experiencing the life of abuse at the hands of society, the medical community, and self that I have had to live.

Lauren on

The article about heavier moms not noticing/tending to their childrens’ increasing weights couldn’t be more timely. I recently got back in touch with a group of family members including an extended cousin and her 5-year-old. My cousin is quite overweight, perhaps even considered obese. Having gotten together with them twice in the past two weeks, I have seen her 5-year-old drinking her own Diet Coke can and Starbucks Frappacino by herself, ice cream sandwiches, and turning down baked potato chips because, in her words, “they aren’t real potato chips.” I would find this diet troubling for any child that age regardless of whether they were a peanut or a giant. The fact that this little girl is already noticably overweight at her age genuinely concerns me.

Obviously it is none of my business how my cousin and her husband choose to feed their child. At the same time, I’d be completely lying if I said it didn’t bother me. There is absolutely no reason a 5-year-old needs to be drinking Diet Coke or Starbucks frappacinos period, and the fact that they see fit to give such junk food to a child who is already overweight really irks me. If anyone is in any sort of similar situation and wants to share their stories/advice, I’d really appreciate it.

Anon on

My cousins daughter sounds a bit like that. Its a hard situation, what I’ve tried to do is come around their apartment on the weekends and take the little girl to the park. Her problem is a mix of diet and the fact that shes way too sedentary. With what you’re saying its especially alarming because not only is she eating high calorie foods, shes also consuming things with very little nutritional value which would worry me more.

Maybe you could send your cousin some articles about childhood obesity and what lack of nutrition can do to their little bodies. It may sound harsh and it may make her upset but you don’t want to see that girl as a obese teenager. I had weight problems from pubescence and its not fun. I’m in my 20s now and I’m finally enjoying just being healthy.

Lauren on

Thanks for the help, Anon. While I definitely agree that in theory addressing the issue of my cousin’s daughter’s weight is ideal, I think this is an unfortunate circumstance where I’m just going to have to bite my tongue (:p) Much as I would love to discuss her diet and weight with my cousin and how unhealthy it is for her now and in the long run, the fact is that a conversation like that may lead to me never seeing the little one in the long run if the relationship with her mother is damaged. If the subject ever comes up, I will attempt to voice my concerns as gently as humanly possible; until then, I’ll just have to hope for the best.

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