Samantha Bee: Hippie Mom at Heart

02/18/2009 at 08:00 PM ET
Matt Carr/Getty Images

Listing “great kids” as her biggest parenting success, The Daily Show correspondent Samantha Bee says that things go best for her family of four when she remembers to take a deep breath … and relax! Case in point? Her daughter Piper, 3, was a late talker. “She’s pretty shy and we didn’t get too caught up in that, even though by New York standards she probably seemed severely behind,” Samantha, 39, recently explained to Babble. “We didn’t get our knickers in a knot over it and now she speaks perfectly clearly in long sentences and won’t stop.”

Of course, that’s not to say Samantha has always been so Zen-like in her approach to parenthood! “I worried about eco-diapers with Piper,” she admits, “but then when we had the second kid, I kind of went, ‘I don’t have time to worry about anything…Anything!'”

“I would pick up a package of diapers from the ground outside my apartment, take them in and use them if I had to. I did become hysterical when it came to New York preschools, because I just got caught up in everyone else’s energy. I regret getting so worked up about it, because in the end we found a great preschool.”

Characterizing both she and husband Jason Jones as “hippies at heart,” Samantha says the mindset she’s adopted since welcoming son Fletcher, 8 months, is in keeping with her own upbringing. “The Canadian style of parenting is very laid-back,” she notes. “I’m definitely a little bit laissez-faire about the whole thing.”

“I’m concerned about safety first and then it’s kind of a free for all. I’m not very rules-oriented. I’m not very structured. I breastfeed my children until they can ask for it by name. I don’t get too worried about the minutiae and I just go with my instincts. That’s working for us so far.”

Click below to read Samantha’s thoughts on having more kids.

Although Piper and Fletcher have both made appearances on the The Daily Show, Samantha has already had to bring the curtain down on her daughter’s participation. “Normally we’re making fun of her, and once we figured that she might sense that, we just stopped entirely,” she explains. “We don’t ever want to feel like we’re damaging her.” Given his young age, however, Fletcher remains fair game! “[He] is on the schedule for an appearance soon,” Samantha revealed.

Neither child should get used to life on a stage, however! “I hope to God that they don’t go into the performing arts,” Samantha admitted. “I pray for all of our sakes, because when I’m old, I would like to be put up in a good-quality nursing home and they won’t be able to afford it if they go into theater.”

“I may have done too many jobs with messed-up children, but, I don’t know, it doesn’t seem like a healthy, laid-back environment. Children already feel like they’re the center of the universe. They don’t need a whole network of people encouraging that on top of what they already feel.”

While she wouldn’t commit to having more children — telling Babble she prefers instead to let her “old, tired eggs” decide her reproductive fate — Samantha clearly enjoys the two she already has, even if it is an enjoyment which took her somewhat by surprise. “Before I had children, I don’t think I felt that there was a maternal bone in my body,” she said. “I mean, I always sort of assumed that having kids was the biological imperative and that I would do that someday, but I wasn’t yearning for it.” As soon as Piper arrived, however, Samantha says she “instantly regretted not starting a lot sooner.”

“I enjoy my children so much; I wish that I had five.”

Source: Babble

FILED UNDER: News , Parenting

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Colleen on

I agree with her on many things she has said, but I would like to make a point. Just because her daughter was a late talker and her speech issues cleared up on their own, that does not mean every child’s speech will get better with no intervention. Sometimes parents say “I want to wait and see” and it ends up being too late to really do “preventative efforts”.

mary on

“Neither child should get used to life on a stage, however! “I hope to God that they don’t go into the performing arts,” Samantha admitted. “I pray for all of our sakes, because when I’m old, I would like to be put up in a good-quality nursing home and they won’t be able to afford it if they go into theater”

That is seriously one of the most funny and true lines I have read in a long time!!:)
When my husband starts teasing our two oldest 16 and 14 year olds they always reminding us ‘that we have to be nice to them because they are the ones who will be picking out our nursing home’. It has become a running joke in our house.

Lilybett on

I agree with Samantha as well, particularly about only breastfeeding until they can ask for it by name. By the time kids can walk over, yank up your shirt and say “Boobies, now”… that’s round about weaning time in my book.

I also agree with Colleen… some kids do pick up language on their own but my nephew wouldn’t be able to go to school next year if his preschool teachers hadn’t picked up on his language problems while he was still a toddler. He’s had two years of intensive speech therapy and is now on track with other kids his age.

Gracie on

Colleen: I see your point. But I know a lot of people who freak out about their kid not hitting every single milestone the minute the parenting books say they should (or the minute their friends kids hit them). As long as a person has already checked it out with their doctor and made sure there’s not reason for the problem, I see nothing wrong with chilling out about it, and letting the kid develop at their own pace.

Fevvers on

My daughter was also a late talker and certainly I got a few comments from other mothers about her being behind and so on. There seemed very much this assumption that early fluent talking meant your child was bright and thus if they were not talking much by three they were probably a bit slow. I even got very sad about it as yet another mother raved about her child’s “incredible vocabulary”…and yet to my surprise at 5 while she is still a bit behind her peers speech wise, she is at the top of her class academically, has no social issues whatsoever and is a gifted athlete. Speech therapists have told me she will catch up by around 7-8 with no intervention and not to worry. Anyway I am not posting this for the sake of it, I just wanted to let other parents out there who are feeling freaked out.

Lindsay on

I don’t get the whole “breastfeed till they can ask for it” mentality. I mean, why stop giving your child something they want and need, simply because they have the verbal skills to express that want and need? I just don’t understand why that is in any way an indicator that child is ready to wean.

My almost 3 year old is still nursing. She asks nicely by saying “Nurse, please” and is not allowed to lift up my shirt. That would just be rude. We teach manners all around, and it doesn’t end with nursing.

D on

I love Sam and Jason! They are TOOOOO funny. It cracks me up when she used Piper in a few of her Daily Show bits. I remember her preggers, but I never knew she had a boy. Yay! They seem like they would be really fun parents!

lady3 on

Lindsay
SIGH! Just as you dont want to be judged DONT JUDGE SAM!
Sam stopped when Piper began asking for it bc Sam (PIPER’s MOTHER) felt it was time.
Obviously you dont feel it is time since your still bf your 3yr old.

It work 4 Sam bc SHE IS PIPER’s MOM,
just as you continue to bf bc you’re your kids mom.

Also, what is an indicator to you to wean?
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Lindsay Says:
February 19th, 2009 at 7:09 am
I don’t get the whole “breastfeed till they can ask for it” mentality. I mean, why stop giving your child something they want and need, simply because they have the verbal skills to express that want and need? I just don’t understand why that is in any way an indicator that child is ready to wean.

My almost 3 year old is still nursing. She asks nicely by saying “Nurse, please” and is not allowed to lift up my shirt. That would just be rude. We teach manners all around, and it doesn’t end with nursing.

Lindsay on

Don’t judge Sam? Who said I was? I don’t care for her arbitrary weaning factor, but I make no judgment, positive or negative, on the quality of her mothering abilities.

Personally, we will wean when it is no longer mutually desired. And if I simply don’t feel like nursing any more, I will be honest with myself and everybody else and say that. No excuses or explanations are needed.

And FTR, I can say this with 150% certainty and honesty, I do not care if people judge me. I do not care what people think of me as a person or as a mother. I am confident in myself and my decisions.

alanna'smom on

What is with some of the commentors on here? If someone weans at age 3, there is always someone saying how they went longer like it’s a competition. A three-year-old doens’t nutirtionally NEED breastmilk. Not in developed countries anyway. Personally I don’t care if someone doesn’t breastfeed at all. But why knock someone who obviously went above and beyond the reccomended year? Why not say, “Go Sarah!” for nursing for the length of time she did?

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