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02/12/2009 at 03:00 PM ET

Some links for your Thursday afternoon:

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Rachel on

As a teacher in a toddler room at a Child Development Center I can answer the question as to “when you should keep your child home” without even reading the article. Rule of thumb — if your child is too ill to participate in every normal activity of daily routine (ie; mealtime, playtime, naptime and outdoor time) then they are too sick to be at school. I can’t stand parents who want us to keep all of the children inside because their child is too sick to be outside.

Also, if your child has been vomiting or having diarreah, keep them home for 24 hours after the LAST episode. I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve sent children home in the afternoon only to have them return the next morning because they were fine the rest of the evening (mostly because mom and dad gave him/her nothing to eat or drink). Inevitably, as soon as the child eats or drinks at school the messiness starts up again. And don’t think you can send a child to school who vomited during the night and expect them not to say anything… they’ll rat you out the second you leave the building and you will have to come pick them up.

Fever. If a child has a fever of 100 degrees or higher, keep them home.

The point is, if your child is sick and miserable there’s no way a caregiver can give them the attention that they need and also provide the other children with the care that they need. You wouldn’t want attention taken away from your child by a sick kid, so afford the other children the same courtesy.

And the teachers too. We don’t enjoy taking care of ill children.

It’s pretty simple really.

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